Dogpatch Press

Fluff Pieces Every Week Day

Tag: subculture

Dogpatch Press and Adjective Species covered by The More You Know podcast.

by Patch O'Furr

The More You Know is a new video podcast hosted by Victor Dimitroff. Season 1 Episode 4: Media in the Furry Fandom talks to guests Pup Matthias (David) from Dogpatch Press and Makyo from [Adjective][Species]. While Victor is still in the beginnings of building his channel, I see a lot of promise in his approach to finding guests and planning notes for good conversation of interest to furries. Take a look.

This is about media by furries, not outsiders.  Specifically the kind that covers what’s going on within the subculture.  There’s much more than you would realize just from talking to friends.  That’s why it’s so fun to start and run your own channel.

Victor comments about how Dogpatch Press seems to find endless stories to fill our regular posting schedule. So how do we find them all?

For the answer, watch Victor’s Q&A and then read our site(s).  You see, it’s a bit of a secret recipe.  But the foundation of everything everyone does in this fandom is about participation and loving what we do. That’s not really a secret at all.

With all the stories out there about furries deserving to be known, and all the dislike for the trashy kind in the mainstream, I take it as an informal mission to Be The Media. I am furry fandom, and so can you!  (Ha).  Check our About pages for how to share your story tips or guest posts. We want you.

Thanks very much to Victor, Makyo, and Pup Matthias.  Everyone had in depth chat the whole time.  I wish I could have been present to give more details about the site founding, mission, and investigating stories (I’ll be there in the future.)

It’s a watershed year for furry stuff, and it’s going to be fun to look back in 2017.  Hope you look forward to many great stories to come.

More from The More You Know:

  • Episode 1: The Tech Trio (using Google Hangouts on Air.)
  • Episode 2: Zootopia (with guests November and Kristofur.)
  • Episode 3: About the Host.

Special Features and Top Articles at Dogpatch Press.

by Patch O'Furr

  • Did you hear about President Obama’s meeting with furries?
  • See how our biggest convention draws $7 million in tourist spending!
  • Want to read interviews with movie directors as high as Pixar, as well as the most creative and devoted furry fans?

Dogpatch Press shares hundreds of articles.  Here’s some special ones that got high traffic, drew views for a long time, dig deep to uncover stories, or they’re just quirky personal favorites. They all highlight a thriving subculture.

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THE REGULAR NEWSDUMP:

See the “Newsdump” tag.  These are digest posts of curated links and “list worthy” small stories, from around the web and the border between subculture and mainstream.  They give a look at the state of the community over time. (Lately there’s so much press that these digests are “on paws”. It’s too much to track!)

INTERVIEWS FOR FANS AND FURRIES:

Creators and Doers make a subculture thrive. Whether they build it from grassrootinterviewss, or feed it from outside with stuff we like, they have valuable words to say.

FRED PATTEN PRESENTS:

Check his latest posts.  Fred is our star guest poster, with a long resume as a fan historian and reviewer.

FURSUITING, THE MOST FURRY ACTIVITY.

patch_icon_fursuitIt’s the most original Furry-generated activity, with it’s own coined name.  Nobody does it like us, and nothing else represents us so directly as “ambassadors”. Call it the theatrical soul of furrydom. Fursuiting has a booming cottage industry, and makers are raising the craft until they’re being envied by commercial mascot designers.  It’s true that only 20% own this costly wearable art, and other worthy members might be irked by the scene-stealing glamor, but a picture is worth a thousand words.  It’s hard to deny their huggable appeal (representing the touch-based name of this subculture!)

FURRY DANCE PARTIES – A NEW MOVEMENT:furclub

Since around 2010, furry dance parties are getting established as urban night life.  They bring new partnerships with established venues for support and crossover.  They build on the growth of cons, but take their own direction.  Howl Toronto says – Con dances happen once a year, and “that’s just not enough to fill the need!”  

THE “FURRY ECONOMY”: 

economyFurry creators are working fan-to-fan with an internal economy that even supports some full time careers. Cons are expanding at a healthy rate.  Furaffinity is an independent project acquired by a venture-capital funded company.  It’s rising beyond a full-fledged subculture to possible commercialization.  How will it develop?

“PALEO FURRIES” – ANTHROPOMORPHISM IN HISTORY:patch_icon_history

Hidden threads connect Furry fandom to a rich history of art and performance. A “museum of furry” could exhibit works that look like they’re from a parallel universe. Writer Phil Geusz calls it Paleo Furries. A “Panto-animals and Paleofurs” con panel could uncover hidden depth for what we love.

A THRIVING SUBCULTURE.

ideasThere’s furry houses with multi-generations of fans. There’s a fur con somewhere in the world every weekend of the year.  It brings speculation about future opportunities for new organizations, projects and events.

BAD MEDIA, GOOD MEDIA.

Exploitation makes sensitivity about being in the spotlight, but media and furries can have a chicken-or-egg relationship.  Terms are getting better, and there’s rising recognition for a self-directed community. It brings power to control access for outsiders, or support them to tell our story like we want.

THE FURRY ART WORLD

It’s one of the most creative fandoms because all the content is self-generated.  Sometimes it even overlaps or achieves recognition in the wider art world.

THE NASCENT FURRY MOVIE SCENE.

Film and video can be more challenging than other media where furries thrive.  Other subcultures have developed enough to support independent film making. There have been a few attempts at furry features and some outside ones that come close. There are many fursuiting shorts (especially music videos) and animation student work. The holy grail might be a furry-made animated feature.

“CELEBRIFURRIES” AND STREET CRED:

Furries have more influence than they even realize. Advertisers covet the street cred of subcultures. Disney winked at us with Zootopia.  Are there mainstream celebrities who are secret furries?  How do other subcultures overlap?

ANTHROPOMORPHIC POLITICS.

Think Democrat donkeys, Republican elephants, and “Animal Farm”, the political allegory by George Orwell.

LIMITS AND LIBERTIES – HOW A HOBBY BRINGS FREEDOM:

protestAcceptance is a big feature of furry subculture. It draws interests together, but nothing represents every member, because membership is self-defined by anyone who claims it.  Some interests get conservative disapproval. It makes tension between freedom and collective interest. It can involve prejudice, laws, and times for a hobby social group to stand up for itself.

WHEN FURRY MEETS FURRY – INTIMACY AND “THE TOPIC THEY LOVE TO HATE”.patch_icon_furry_love

It’s not an urban legend – some furries get wild. But sex isn’t a definer.  It can be a family friendly hobby too.  Media hypes sex, but romantic themes are part of being human, and furries are just regular people with extra rich imaginations.  Being unusually open and expressive is required for an interest spectrum beyond the default.  It can cause controversy. It also makes first-time visitors call them the most friendly people you could ever party with. This blog is anti-prude and not shy about sex-positivity.

FURRY TRASH!

Sometimes it’s fun to mix satire with news.  Keep Furry Weird.

WHAT’S WRONG WITH FANDOM:

Furries have been punching-bags for sensational media exploiting them as freaks.  It comes from bias to only look for the worst in people.  There’s stigma, shaming, scapegoating, and a streak of homophobia.  There are even enemies within who are motivated by authority or insecurity.  But dogmatic negativity doesn’t build anything.  That’s why it’s losing power with time. If you hear of “inherent” problems, especially from insiders- it calls for pointing out the positive, expressive nature of the group.

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT:

Crime happens in any community.  Sometimes it overlaps with furries.  Most everything they do is harmless and positive, but rare and marginal problems can get sensationalized.  It calls for an eye on biased judgement.

SPECIAL GUEST POSTS BY PUP MATTHIAS:

MORE SPECIAL GUEST POSTS:

Goddess, by Arilin Thorferra – book review by Fred Patten.

by kiwiztiger

Submitted by Fred Patten, Furry’s favorite historian and reviewer.

Goddess, by Arilin Thorferra
Dallas, TX, FurPlanet Productions, January 2015, trade paperback $9.95 (141 pages).

“This is a mature content book.  Please ensure that you are of legal age to purchase this material in your state or region.”

When furry fandom began to develop in the 1980s, one of the first “subgenres” to be seen in traded cartoon art wGoddessas the furry macros – giant anthro animals striding Godzilla-style through cities of tiny-by-comparison furries. Yet when furry literature appeared, this subgenre quietly vanished.  Or went underground.

Here is what may be the first professionally-publicized furry macrophile novella: Goddess, by Arilin Thorferra, “the founder of ‘The Giants’ Club’ and an acclaimed macrophile storyteller.” (blurb)

Russell Rittenhouse (cougar) is the young librarian at Bennett University, one of the leading West Coast private universities. He wants to become a literature professor (with tenure), and has just begun the slow climb of the academic social-political ladder there. He gets a courtesy invitation to an exclusive reception for the visiting King of the small Pacific island of Uli Hahape, near Hawaii. Cornelius Bennett (rabbit), a sixtyish railroad and hotel multimillionaire and benefactor of the university, has arranged the reception to unveil his model of the ritzy superhotel that he hopes to build there, if the king will permit it. King Aremana (otter) is polite but clearly not impressed.

Russell drops out of the social soiree to a sofa to reread one of his favorite novels, The Great Gatsby. He is joined by the king’s daughter, who is also a Fitzgerald fan. They spend the rest of the evening discussing literature. The next day Bennett corners him in the library. Bennett suspects that King Aremana is about to reject the hotel, and he noticed Russell’s and Princess Kailani’s friendly conversation at the party. If Russell will continue to see the Princess, and subtly promote the hotel project, Bennett will make sure that he gets that professorship. Read the rest of this entry »

Controversy and success: San Francisco’s Frolic party – interview with Neonbunny part 4

by Patch O'Furr

02Interview series:  Artists, animation directors, DJ’s and event organizers, superfans, and more…
Neonbunny is founding DJ and promoter of Frolic. The 90 minute interview has 4 parts, with one a week posting this month.

4) Controversy and success – Music, DIY culture, Furry events, sex, drama, and more.

 

For many furries in the world, the San Francisco Bay Area is the place to be. For many in the Bay, Frolic is THE most furry place. It isn’t the only center, but it’s an influential one. It’s not just the best Furry party… I’d call it the best party San Francisco has, period.  Check out Frolic’s website, and read about it in The Bold Italic magazine.

Neonbunny, founding DJ and promoter of Frolic, met me for a long interview over dinner. His partner Jody who handles tech, lighting and animation was with us.  It was a year ago, just after they got back from 2013’s Burning Man event in Nevada.  Neon’s early trips to Burning Man led to discovering Furries in the early 2000’s, and making friends to help throw parties.  It turned into a scene connected to local counterculture.  Since Frolic started in 2010, it’s had nice success.  We talked about the wide roles of such events and their makers:

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lobo-neon

(Patch:) I thought DJing would come before promoting shows, but it’s the other way around for you.

(Neon:)  I’ve always been musically inclined, just like I was inclined to wear animal costumes. When I was a kid, for Halloween, it was always a cat costume. My parents got me keyboard lessons. I was in a high school band, played drums, messed around with a punk band with some friends, and always into new music.

I pay attention to lot of electronic music, and gothic kind of stuff.  I hang out on a forum that has people who are almost legendary. It’s like, “I was listening to your album when I was a kid.”   This week I saw Gary Numan and met the guy from Cold Cave.  Some is going strong since then, some is having kind of a renaissance. 

I was into a lot of that in high school.  I was always into punk rock as a kid. Electronic music has some of the same aspects, it’s about self publishing – there’s a DIY aspect.  You don’t need a record label – it’s people publishing their friends.

Read the rest of this entry »

The furry scene: San Francisco’s Frolic party – interview with Neonbunny part 3

by Patch O'Furr

02Interview series:  Artists, animation directors, DJ’s and event organizers, superfans, and more…
Neonbunny is founding DJ and promoter of Frolic. The 90 minute interview has 4 parts, with one a week posting this month.

3) The furry scene – Frolic’s venue: The Stud – Promoting and operating Frolic.

 

For many furries in the world, the San Francisco Bay Area is the place to be. For many in the Bay, Frolic is THE most furry place. It isn’t the only center, but it’s an influential one. It’s not just the best Furry party… I’d call it the best party San Francisco has, period.  Check out Frolic’s website, and read about it in The Bold Italic magazine.

Neonbunny, founding DJ and promoter of Frolic, met me for a long interview over dinner. His partner Jody who handles tech, lighting and animation was with us. It was a year ago, just after they got back from 2013’s Burning Man event in Nevada.  Neon’s early trips to Burning Man led to discovering Furries in the early 2000’s, and making friends to help throw parties.  It turned into a scene connected to local counterculture.

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frolic-revised-generic

(Patch) – The Stud adds a lot of history to Frolic.  One of the bar tenders, Bernadette, wanted to talk more about this.

(Neon) – Michael is the owner.  He was the manager in the early 1990’s when The Stud was going into financial trouble.  It came close to shutting down.  He and a few bartenders got together.  They would have been fired.  The owner needed to sell – it was near going bankrupt. They took out a loan to buy- Michael did most work to be the major shareholder.  Maybe not initially, but others sold their shares or died.

It’s important for culture to have places you know you can go where people care.

San Francisco’s Folsom Street area used to have dozens of gay bars. Now it’s down to a couple.  It used to be a whole mile stretch from SOMA to the Castro, full of gay bars and clubs back in the 1970’s.  AIDS killed a lot of people.

A friend who I know (through dancing in a furry music video together) took me to Powerhouse.  He’s connected with the Radical Faeries.  It’s one of the only places that still has the old school 1970’s vibe.  You go in the back alley – it’s closed off but not technically under the roof, so people do whatever they want back there.

The Stud has history before Michael and the owners bought it.  It’s the oldest gay club still still operating.  It was established in the late 1960’s, where the Holy Cow is now.  It moved to the new place in the 1980’s.  It has a history of encouraging counterculture in show and costumes.

Read the rest of this entry »

Starting Frolic: San Francisco’s Frolic party – interview with Neonbunny part 2

by Patch O'Furr

02Interview series:  Artists, animation directors, DJ’s and event organizers, superfans, and more…
Neonbunny is founding DJ and promoter of Frolic. The 90 minute interview has 4 parts, with one a week posting this month.

2) Starting Frolic – Throwing parties, finding other furries.

 

For many furries in the world, the San Francisco Bay Area is the place to be. For many in the Bay, Frolic is THE most furry place. It isn’t the only center, but it’s an influential one. It’s not just the best Furry party… I’d call it the best party San Francisco has, period.  Check out Frolic’s website, and read about it in The Bold Italic magazine.

Neonbunny, founding DJ and promoter of Frolic, met me for a long interview over dinner. His partner Jody who handles tech, lighting and animation was with us.  It was a year ago, just after they got back from 2013’s Burning Man event in Nevada.  Neon’s early trips to Burning Man led to discovering Furries:

___________

(Patch) – So you got into throwing all these parties in San Francisco, in the early 2000’s…

(Neon) – My second year at Burning Man, I learned about furries.

We had this venue in 2002- a movie theater in San Francisco’s Mission district.  Back then it was called Fandanga.  It’s where Sherilyn Connelly (SF Weekly journalist who covers furry happenings) does her Bad Movie Nights.

I said, hey, lets show some bunny porn.  I went online searching.  Next thing, I was reading all about furries.  I was totally fascinated.  It was just after Fur Con, around easter time.  It wasn’t until next year I went to my first furry event.  That was Fur Con.  It’s where I met Jody.  It was his first Fur Con too, in 2003.

The owner of The Stud came to our first bunny party.  He said it was his favorite party of the year.  He would spend half his time in Hawaii, half in SF.  He always came back for Bunny Jam.

We were into the wild crazy weirdness – more than just a dance party.  If people wouldn’t complain about the music, we were doing it wrong.  It was for the WTF factor. It was more an art happening than a rave.

Read the rest of this entry »

From counterculture to Furry: San Francisco’s Frolic party – interview with Neonbunny part 1

by Patch O'Furr

02Interview series:  Artists, animation directors, DJ’s and event organizers, superfans, and more…
Neonbunny is founding DJ and promoter of Frolic. The 90 minute interview has 4 parts, with one a week posting this month.

 

1) Counterculture to Furry – Neonbunny’s background in the SF Bay Area. 

 

For many furries in the world, the San Francisco Bay Area is the place to be. For many in the Bay, Frolic is THE most furry place. It isn’t the only center, but it’s an influential one. It’s not just the best Furry party… I’d call it the best party San Francisco has, period.  Check out Frolic’s website, and read about it in The Bold Italic magazine.

Neonbunny, founding DJ and promoter of Frolic, met me for a long interview over dinner. His partner Jody who handles tech, lighting and animation was with us.  It was a year ago, just after they got back from 2013’s Burning Man event in Nevada.  It was a nice place to start:

___________

NeonBunnyFull-Suit(Neon)  – We’re still catching up from Burning Man.  Our living room is piled with all our gear – there’s dust in everything.

(Patch) –  My friends showed me videos of all the amazing sights. I hear it’s a week of bad food and good drugs.

And dust storms.

How many people were at Camp Fur?

Camp Fur itself had 45 people.  There were lots of furries elsewhere.

Read the rest of this entry »

The most furry place in the universe? San Francisco’s Frolic party – interview with Neonbunny

by Patch O'Furr

Coming soon -one a week posting this month:

A four part interview with Neonbunny, founding DJ and promoter of Frolic.

 

____________________________

For many furries in the world, the San Francisco Bay Area is the place to be.  For many in the Bay, Frolic is THE most furry place.  It’s not the only center, but it’s an influential one. It’s not just the best Furry party… I’d call it the best party San Francisco has, period.

Check out Frolic’s website, or come every second Saturday of the month.  Wear anything, but expect costumes too fabulous for words. The Bold Italic magazine said: this is some next level shit.

FrolicFlierSince it started in 2010, Frolic has inspired club nights to spring up across the USA – a subculture movement.  Every month, it brings dedicated supporters who travel from hours away. It attracts out-of-towner friends, who show up as superstar of the night for regulars who appreciate them back the same way.

It makes a ripple in local culture in general, attracting a section of curiosity seekers who want to see what furries are. Occasionally, drunk bachelorettes roll up in a limo to annoy tolerant regulars with too many selfies. Often, the party is a gateway for newcomers who come back in freshly sewn fur. (Like me!)

It’s become a local monthly mini-con, and branched out to do a once-a-year special club night, coinciding with January’s Further Confusion con, 45 minutes south in San Jose. There’s also a once-a-year outdoor free festival in the park, “Furries in the Wild,” across the bay in Oakland.

Other parties seem tepid after Frolic.  It tops them with more hugs (even between dogs and cats) and a positively-freaky, are-those-costumes-or-am-I-hallucinating? vibe found nowhere else.

Read the rest of this entry »