Responses to fursuit auction story confirm $17,500 top price.

by Patch O'Furr

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Last week’s article about fursuits and top prices had very nice feedback.

Andreus wrote to mention that he owns Vex:

…a realistic MixedCandy-made werewolf fursuit that cost roughly $4,500 US / £2,600 GBP at the time of purchase. It’s got body-shaping padding such as digitigrade legs and large muscles for the proper muscular werewolf look. It’s also got a moving jaw.

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The responses helped to settle on some figures that were being speculated about:

  • $4,500 as a general high range for standard commissions.
  • $8,025 as the top auction to date on Furbuy. (Update: $11,575.)
  • $17,500 is now confirmed as highest price for special commissions. (Of course every commission is special, but you might say that some are more experimental than others.)

    Clockwork Creatures sabertooth

    Clockwork Creatures sabertooth

Spottacus shared very interesting info about his highly specialized collection of suits:

“I have multiple suits that surpass the $8k mark, and I can verify the $17k one.  In my most costly suits, the reason has usually been NFT fur, custom electronics, or special parts.

For example, the Clockwork Creatures sabertooth by Qarrezel and Matt, the NFT fur and a custom set of handpaws by Lance Ikegawa that had resin claws cast around my fingers so the claws were rock hard, a bit sharp, and dextrous (I could pick up small items with the tips) came to about $9,000. The same is true of my NFT covered serval with sewn spots, which came to about $10,000.

More costly was my recent Primal Visions cheetah by Lex Rudd. The NFT fur was woven on the loom with spots woven in fiber by fiber on a 4 way stretch backing. The result is a fragile fur but little stitching that fits like a body glove, stretches like dancewear, and feels like cheetah fur to the touch. The fur was over $8,000. With assembly and fees, the suit cost $15,600. Also, there is an arduino system that changes the eyes based on my breathing, growling, and heart rate. It did not fit into the tight head in our first build, but will be installed, and this adds nearly $2,000, for a total of $17,500 (this is the $15-17k suit Patch alluded to.)

My latex sabertooth with custom latex foam life-cast for the inside, and sculpted in clay for the outside (not carved from foam) with custom laser cut and hand appliqued hundreds of spots was about $9,000.

Last, in progress on drawing board stage are several suits that will be more. Most costly is a fully body illuminated ardunio controlled light suit. Two local furs (you know who you are) are working on this, and when done I expect the cost to be close to $25,000 completed.”

The $17,500 Primal Visions Cheetah.

The $17,500 Primal Visions Cheetah.

A critic responded:

“I investigated NFT for a build and was told it would wear out after about a year or so because it was designed for film shoots. Sounds like a very odd choice for a long term costume unless one has the goal of demonstrating affluence.”

This is a hobby – not a necessity of life – and so what?  I defended what Spottacus called his artistic decisions. My answer:

“I brought up the topic because I like the original art of fursuit building and performance. Someone has to support artists who do it. If they are taking in large sales for very special custom creations, I think that is wonderful for the art form. Suit making is hardly a wealth building career, more like something that could let you get by OK, if you’re one of the handful of the most dedicated crafters.

Let’s count people who support them as patrons of the arts. Having a piece of wearable art like that is hardly investment spending – it’s to use, and I like to think it makes others happy. So I can’t criticize that, even if I couldn’t afford the top prices. Compare it to owning a special car – these prices aren’t even more than a cheap car costs for anyone.”

You could much sooner criticize drivers who zoom around in flashy cars.  Some people like car shows or NASCAR events for a mainstream-approved spectacle – but I’d rather go to a Furry con.

A very good partial fursuit can be had for under $1,000.  I think it’s a very accessible price for a hobby.  Those who don’t buy often make their own – and this is why furries are cool.  I can’t find anything wrong with a little bit of “conspicuous consumption” that spreads fun, creative performance like that.